Interpretation on Tumor Markers

Tumor marker is an important factor that often used to help detect the presence of cancer. However, many cancer patients and their families fail to understand due to its strong professionalism. Prof. Li Xiaoshi, an authoritative oncologist who has more than 40 years of medical experience, will give a detailed interpretation on Tumor Marker.

St. Stamford Modern Cancer Hospital Guangzhou, tumor marker, CA125, PSA, CEA, AFP

What is Tumor Marker?

A tumor marker is a biomarker found in blood, urine, or body tissues that can be elevated by the presence of one or more types of cancer. There are many different tumor markers, each indicative of a particular disease process, and they are used in oncology to help detect the presence of cancer.

Common Types of Tumor Marker

AFP(Alpha-fetoprotein)

Associated Cancers: liver cancer and germ cell tumors

What’s analyzed: Blood

How used: To help diagnose liver cancer and follow response to treatment; to assess stage, prognosis, and response to treatment of germ cell tumors

ALK gene rearrangements and overexpression

Associated Cancers: Non-small cell lung cancer and anaplastic large cell lymphoma

What's analyzed: Tumor

How used: To help determine treatment and prognosis

B2M(Beta 2-microglobulin)

Associated Cancers: multiple myeloma, some lymphomas, and leukemia

What's analyzed: Blood, urine, CSF

How used: Determines prognosis, monitors treatment & for recurrence

CA125 (cancer antigen 125)

Associated Cancers: ovarian cancer

What’s analyzed: Blood

How used: to help in diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and evaluation of recurrence

CA15-3/CA27.29

Associated Cancers: Breast cancer

What's analyzed: Blood

How used: To assess whether treatment is working or if the cancer has recurred

CA19-9

Associated Cancers: Pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, bile duct cancer, and gastric cancer

What's analyzed: Blood

How used: To help measure response to treatment.

CEA(carcinoembryonic antigen)

Associated Cancers: colorectal cancer, lung cancer, stomach cancer, thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, ovary cancer

What’s analyzed: Blood

How used: To keep track of how well cancer treatments are working and check if cancer has come back or spread

PSA (prostate-specific antigen)

Associated Cancers: prostate cancer

What’s analyzed: Blood

How used: to help in diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and evaluation of recurrence

Thyroglobulin

Associated Cancers: thyroid cancer

What’s analyzed: Blood

How used: to help monitor response to treatment and diagnose recurrence.

Tumor markers can help find out if cancer has spread, whether the treatment is working, or if the cancer has come back after the patient has finished the treatment.

But tumor markers can also show up in certain noncancerous conditions, if you have question about your test result, please Consult Online, or call at 02-8-8221222 for professional medical advice.

*Surgery, in addition to the appropriate chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are effective in treating early cancer, but certain patients in late stage of cancer may not be tolerate surgery well as they can be relatively weak. A combination of carefully planned minimally invasive therapy, chemotherapy or radiotherapy can effectively reduce the side effects and discomfort of treatment and may help patient get better efficacy.

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